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About Us

What you write here is totally up to you, there is no right or wrong way to complete your 'About Me' page.  We advise making your language friendly and approachable, while being informative and professional.
 
You should also consider adding key information such as:
 
  • How many years experience you have
  • Your skills
  • Your qualifications
  • Your contact details
  • Local areas you cover
  • Your policies
  • Your policy on repairs/returns
  • Any additional services you offer
  • Why people should choose you
 
This area can be fully edited and gives you the opportunity to introduce yourself, your website or company, your products or services.

Animals

Renovations
About Us
Events
Rehab
Rentals

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Fawns
   Fawns, of course, are our dearest loves.  We have saved dozens of fawns and although they are all precious, some really capture our heart.  Usually does stay with their mothers for life so we have to be very careful that the babies don't imprint on us or, when they are big 200 lb girls, they will stand at the backdoor and demand to come in for dinner!
     In our latest group, we had 7 males and 2 females.  Oddly enough, the females weren't the ones who tried to imprint.  We had two males who had to be kept alive by tube feeding (not plesant for either of us!) and they will still come close to me as yearlings.  It's nice to see that, months later, 7 of these have remained a little herd and three (the two friendly males and one female) are exceptionally close and are never but a few feet apart.  
     Bottle feeding so many babies, five times a day, isn't easy but it is rewarding.  Deer are so intelligent, much like dogs or goats.  They each have distinct personalities, love to play and make lasting relationships.      
     We don't allow company to come in contact with our fawns because we want them to fear people lest they come into contact with hunters.  When they are released, they are truly wild and have to forage and live like any other deer.  It is nice to see them in the woods around sunset or sunrise, and sometimes they will come into the pasture to eat under our seventy five 100 hundred year old pecan trees.  Their color is distint and unusual to each of them and I can usually pick out and remember the name and problems each baby had in the nursery. 

What do you mean you don't want a hamburger? 


Although I am licensed for most mammals and reptiles, fawns are my specialty now.  Over the years, I've worked with hundreds of squirrels, opossums, several adorable ground hogs, lots of snakes and turtles and even a vulture and raccoon or two.  Working with animals has allowed me to see that every being, no matter how intelligent we see it, large or small, beautiful or, like the vulture, different looking, has a soul and a will to live.  That is why most of us at Spotted Fawn Farm are vegetarians. 


Horses

     We have between 9 - 12 resident horses here at any given time.  Kayla, our equine handler, teaches, rehabs and boards horses.  Some are calm and easy and some are wild babies, but all come with a story and all will behave long enought to take a piece of apple or carrot.  
     We have stall and pasture availability for those traveling with their own horses.  Since we are located not far off I-85, we are convenient for those going back and forth to shows and races.  We have lots of horse friendly trails that meander through almost 60 acres. There is also a large lighted arena, round pen, hot water wash area and grassy pastures for horses that are tired of standing in their trailers.  
We also have one donkey, Bethleham.  He's an overweight little guy who is timid and loves his old mare friend, Gracie, who is 35 years old.  Donkeys sing a mornful song and ours certainly spends a good amount of time belting out his version of donkey opera.  His idea of Heaven would be standing beside Gracie while someone brushes his wiry coat. 

Pigs

Pigs, gosh we love them.  We've had lots of pigs over the years and are delighted by their sillly personalities.  
Unlike their reputations, pigs are clean and so darn smart! We currently have three resident pigs, Babette, the large black pig who is beautiful and knows it, Orson, a shy and blind male who just wants to be alone and Eleanore, the social butterfly, who will find anyone willing to scratch her stomach and flop over at their feet.  She was raised in a college apartment with four boys and fully believes herself to be the center of all things.  Eleanore is the one we have to watch so she doesn't walk down the isle after some unsuspecting bride. 
  1. NAME OF PRODUCT
Percy the Cow
 Do you know that dairy cows are kept pregnant for life?  Their babies are taken from them immediately and, if it's a male and not useful for dairy life, it is sometimes killed, force fed for veal or sold for slaughter for animal food?  It's a horrible secret.  
Kayla, our equine handler, found Percy at about two weeks old being sold by someone trying to make a buck on throwaway calves. 
Percy was so skinny and sickly that we worried every day that he would not make it.  He did pull through and has spent his childhood playing with the dogs.  He has no idea he's a cow!  Kayla has plans to teach him to jump and carry a rider.  We're not sure it will happen but everyone enjoys watching her try.  So far, he can comfortably wear a saddle and carry a chihuahua! 
Tortellini and Ravi
     Tortellini is a 175 lb African Sulcata Tortoise that came to us about 12 years ago.  Until then, we had no idea a reptile could have such a huge personality.  We estimate him to be at least 60 years old and he could live 60 more.  For such an old guy,  he has run away twice, been featured on the news, on national news, and local papers.  If one of us sits down near him he will come and try to get in our laps!  He has a young girlfriend, Ravi (short for Ravioli) who doesn't return his love.
     We are totally against tortoises for pets.  It is hard to replicate the lives they would have in the wild and difficult to meet their feeding requirements and exercise needs.  Tort walks miles each day because, in their native habitats, they are constantly on the move.  In the summer, our tortoises eat only grass, which is best for them, but in the winter, they must be kept above 60 degrees, fed a variety of greens and hay and constantly monitored to make sure they don't get sick.  A respiratory infection is a constant worry. Pet tortoises should NEVER be released into the wild.  They cannot adapt and do not have the skills to survive.  


Sheep, Turkeys, Chickens, Guineas and one crazy Emu
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We have two sheep, Clarence and Ma.  Clarence is NOT a friendly sheep and especially despises children and short ladies.  For this reason, we never let anyone in their pasture.  A small boy once jumped on Clarence and tried to ride him rodeo style and a sheep never forgets.  Ma is a rescue.  She is shy and probably insecure as Clarence is a neutered male and she most likely wonders why he doesn't find her attractive. 
Our Emu, Tiki Hut, was delivered to us as a hatchling.  He was found on a golf course, something we are still mighty confused about.  He was a gorgeous striped chick that we raised with baby ducks.  He still spends a lot of time in the summer sitting in the pig pool and wondering why he's doing it.  He is hillarious when he runs and, if he were a human, we imagine he would be Ru Paul. 
We have a huge group of chickens, turkeys and guineas.  They lay organic eggs and only eat organic food, worms and veggies.  Some of our hens lay beautiful blue eggs! They have intricate family groups and, true to the saying, often times birds of a feather do flock together, even when they were raised with other types.  On the flipside, our Turkey has been in a love triangle with another turkey and a guinea for quite some time